1. esswishlist:

35. Bulbasaur Flowerpot (Succulent Monsters)
x7r found them! :) you can buy these from here or there is a 3D print version

    esswishlist:

    35. Bulbasaur Flowerpot (Succulent Monsters)

    x7r found them! :) you can buy these from here or there is a 3D print version

    Vor 2 Wochen  /  152.843 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: esswishlist

  2. rufftoon:

gurihiru:

Rocket Raccoon

*dies of cute*

    rufftoon:

    gurihiru:

    Rocket Raccoon

    *dies of cute*

    Vor 2 Wochen  /  18.638 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: gurihiru

  3. photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    Vor 3 Wochen  /  271.760 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: tastefullyoffensive

  4. loveandasandwich:

*~*Finding inner peace*~*

    loveandasandwich:

    *~*Finding inner peace*~*

    Vor 3 Wochen  /  90 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: loveandasandwich

  5. mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.
It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.
Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.
A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.
Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:
Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+
Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 
If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 
BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

    mikikoponczeck:

    pancakesprince:

    naiadestricolor:

    coelasquid:

    leighanief:

    luvlysmilk:

    delano-laramie:

    Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.

    It’s ruining an industry.

    Wtf wow

    What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.

    Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

    Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

    Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

    Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.

    A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.

    Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

    Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:

    • Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
    • Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
    • Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+

    Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 

    If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

    I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 

    BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

    I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. 
    The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

    (via lysa-bell)

    Vor 3 Wochen  /  11.500 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: delano-laramie

  6. photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    Vor 1 Monat  /  13.247 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: twitter.com

  7. photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    Vor 1 Monat  /  330.519 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: unapologetically-taina

  8. Vor 1 Monat  /  59 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: iheart-photos

  9. Vor 2 Monaten  /  23 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: fitear1590

  10. me: *has 10 books to read*

    me: *buys 3 more*

    me: *ends up reading fanfiction*

    Vor 2 Monaten  /  241.463 Anmerkungen

  11. reblog if you ever actually used a phone with a “rotary dial” on it

    (via beggerprince72)

    Wi-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch, wi-ch-ch, wi-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch……

    And getting your finger caught under the metal thingy.

    (via iwantthatcoat)

    nines were such a paain

    (via amindamazed)

    dialing long distance was good times with those fucking things

    (via azhuresunsoar)

    (via lysa-bell)

    Vor 2 Monaten  /  6.473 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: beggerprince72

  12. Vor 3 Monaten  /  5.348 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: heart-nakama

  13. batched:

    perlockholmes:

    This is the coolest thing I’ve seen in a while! Another brilliant parody from The Hillywood Show. 
    Let’s do the Time Warp again!

    Can’t believe that wasn’t actually David talking… That was uncanny.

    (via superwholockthecomic)

    Vor 3 Monaten  /  3.898 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: perlockholmes

  14. psychofactz:

 

    psychofactz:

     

    Vor 3 Monaten  /  2.754 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: psychofactz.com

  15. Make yourself so happy so that when others look at you they become happy, too.
    – Yogi Bhajan  (via fuckinq)

    (via viria)

    Vor 3 Monaten  /  136.078 Anmerkungen  /  Quelle: thelittleyellowdiary